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well


well

The word “well” can be an adjective or an adverb. For this reason, it can be a tricky word to master. Knowing how to use “well” properly makes a big difference in how your English sounds.

Generally, the word  well means good.   

examples
  • She’s doing well. (The adverb modifies “doing.”)
  • He’s not well. (adjective) 
  • She’s not feeling well. (adjective) 
  • You speak English well.  (adverb. “Well” modifies “speak.”)
  • Well done! (This is an expression, but “well” modifies “done.”) 
  • There’s nothing better than a job well done. (adverb)
  • Your supervisor speaks well of you. (adverb)
adults, people, international-3984852.jpg
  • They’re all doing well in their English class. 
  • How well are you doing with your English? 
Well done!

English speakers use “well done” to congratulate a person on his or her good work. 

well + past participle

By putting “well” in front of a past participle, you can create an adjective. Isn’t that interesting? Here are some examples:  

  • His jacket is very well worn. 
  • It’s well known among the people who live here that that bakery bakes the best bread. 
  • Toyotas are very well made. 
  • They are well-made cars. (When “well + past participle” appear before a noun, a hyphen is often used in order to accentuate the adjectival function of the phrase.)  
Well...

By putting “well” in front of a past participle, you can create an adjective. Isn’t that interesting? Here are some examples:  

  • Well, one thing I like about traveling by train is that it’s very relaxing. (This is a simple statement of an opinion preceded by the word “well.”)
  • Well, this is a find mess that you’ve gotten us into! 
  • Well, what do we have here? (This is an expression that is often used when talking about some sort of surprise or unusual situation.) 
  • Well, well, well. (This is similar to the above expression.) 

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